Data Privacy and the API Economy: Why I Joined Skyflow

It’s been the case for at least the last ten years that software developers write less and less of the code in their apps. And yet, over the same time, apps have gotten increasingly sophisticated and complex, and run more code than ever. How can both be true? 

It’s because large parts of the functionality of apps today are built by calling third-party cloud APIs, rather than written from scratch in new code. Need payments functionality in your app? Use the Stripe API. Need your app to send text messages for two-factor authentication? Try the Twilio API. Want single sign-on in your app? There’s the Okta API. The list goes on and on. The “API economy” is large and growing.

This leads us to the maxim: build less, ship more.

At Skyflow, we saw all that and asked ourselves a few simple questions: What if privacy had an API? What would that look like? How should it work? How could we create a service that would help developers, whether at startups or big companies, solve the difficult problems of data privacy, security, and compliance?

And then we built it—Skyflow is the world’s first zero trust data privacy vault delivered as an API. Giants like Apple and Netflix already use zero trust data vaults, but they have been out of reach to anyone without the years and millions of dollars required to build one. Our core vision is to make this best-of-breed technology available to any developer, giving them peace of mind that their sensitive data is both secure and usable, and freeing them to work on other things and to ship faster.

In short, What if everyone had a privacy data vault like the tech leaders?

It’s that product and that vision that attracted me to Skyflow; the amazing reactions I’ve seen from early customers sealed the deal. I’ve joined Skyflow as full-time CMO. 

Skyflow just makes sense to me. My career has always been about platform and developer tech, and it has spanned the cloud era from before it was called cloud. I worked at a startup that tried to put dev tools online 20 years ago (too early). I went to Apple, where part of my job was to get developers to integrate a new “web service” called .Mac—the clumsy forefather of iCloud and other Apple services—into their applications. I put in a long stint helping build the platform-as-a-service business at Salesforce. A few years later, I helped scale Heroku from its Ruby PaaS origins to a bigger world of polyglot developers, infrastructure-as-a-service, and larger deals at startups and enterprises alike. The API economy is the next and most exciting stage of the 20+ year cloud revolution.

I couldn’t be happier to be part of Skyflow. And I’m hiring—come join the flow.